Ang pagkakaroon Ang Puso Para sa mga Ang Mahina ay nangangahulugan na ang pagkakaroon ng Isang Puso Para sa Diyos sa pamamagitan ng Martin Buehlmann

Hindi na matagal na ang nakalipas aking asawa at ako ay upo sa aming kusina, paghahanda ng isang magandang pamilya ng hapunan. Bigla aming doorbell Rang. Pagpunta sa pinto nakita natin Ghebremariam, isang 38 taong gulang na babae mula sa Eritrea taong gumagawa para Mariam. Ghebremariam ay isang refugee mula sa Eritrea, isang kalapit na bansa sa Etyopya. She had to leave three children behind and has now been in Europe for four years.

We have known Ghebremariam for quite a while, since Christmas when she came to our home for a party for the lonely and enjoyed it immensely. As she sat with us in the kitchen, she began to share more of her heartbreaking story. When she came to Europe four years ago she hoped to find a place of peace, a home, a hiding place from all the abuses, all the arbitrariness and unrighteousness she had to live under. But now, as she was sharing her story, crying aloud, she told us she was just refused as a refugee, being left without any rights and without support. Our dinner changed from a leisure time to a wonderful expression of care, love, acceptance. We listened, cried with her, hugged her, prayed for her and finally blessed her with some money. After two hours her countenance lifted and she smiled slightly. When she left we knew that we had expressed the kindness of Jesus to this dear woman.

Suddenly it dawned on me. It is Good Friday and Jesus has visited our home. We were able to console Him, for Jesus says in the Gospel of Matthew chapter 25, that whatever we have done to one of the least, we have done to Him.

Serving others means meeting Jesus in the lives of others, sharing their pain and helplessness. As we are faithfully doing this as an expression of our lifestyle, it becomes a continuous prayer and invitation for Christ to come.

Mag-Uri Sa Mahina sa pamamagitan ng Robert Pittman

"Ang pagiging mabait sa mga mahihirap ay tulad ng pagpapautang sa Panginoon; siya ay gantimpalaan ka para sa kung ano ang nagawa mo na. " (Kawikaan 19:17)

 

Once a month we go out as a church and we call it “Love Louisville.” We also do an annual event that is city-wide with the same name (magpatala nang umalis: www.lovelouisville.org for more info).

As a follow up to Christmas, we recently did what we called: "Winter Warm Outreach.” We collected new or gently used coats, hats, gloves and scarfs for men, women and children. We worked with Starbucks and they donated coffee and hot chocolate along with freshly baked muffins.

We often do other types of outreaches like bottled water giveaways, business blast where we take goodie bags to area workers, or gas buy-downs where we give out $2 bills at area gas stations and wash people’s wind shields for free. We still do those, but recently God has given me a heart to reach out more to the poor, the abused, the lonely, the neglected. So every month we have been very deliberate about doing outreaches that touch those people. So off we go to “Winter Warm.”

We drove to one of the poorest areas in Louisville and set up our giveaway in the area park adjacent to the projects. While people set up, a couple of guys and I started knocking on doors to invite people. “We’ve got FREE coats, hats, gloves for you and your kids along with hot chocolate” and people came in below freezing temperatures because of love. Up to 100 people loved, served, clothed, conversations with, thanks given, prayers prayed.

But there was one person I’ll never forget. Her name was Sellina. I was walking back from knocking on doors when I met her. She was in her car getting ready to take off when I walked up to the window and told her about the giveaway in the park. She said, “I thought about coming over, but I didn’t want to take away from other people who needed it more than me.” And then to my surprise she pulled out a $5 bill and insisted I take it to put in our offering for outreach. I normally don’t take any kind of donations because we don’t want people to think there are any strings attached to our outreach. But she was insistent and started to tear up as she said, “Please, please take this and put it toward your outreach.”

She placed the $5 bill in my hand and as she did I joined hands with her and asked if I could pray with her. After I prayed, I looked up and there were tears streaming down her face and she could barely get the words out: “You don’t know how much I needed that…I’ve just been evicted.”

$5 dollars to her was like $50 to someone else, o $500, o $5000. It reminds me of the story Jesus told about the poor widow who gave money to the offering: "All the others gave what they do not need, but this poor widow gave out of her need” (Mark 12:44).

I never saw Sallina again, but I’ve never forgotten her and neither has God: "He puts poor people on their feet again; He rekindles burned-out lives with fresh hope, restoring dignity and respect to their lives” (1 Samuel 2:8). Guess what? He uses you and me to do it.

All God asks is this: "to remember to help the poor—something I really wanted to do” (Galacia 2:10). Because on one of the coldest days of the year, a woman who was evicted touched my life. And I believe God used me to touch hers.