Un compromiso bíblico exige Relevancia Cultural de Paul Alexander

Mucho se ha dicho y escrito en los últimos años, ofreciendo todo tipo de críticas de las Iglesias de hoy en día para el comercio de adhesión al Evangelio de Jesucristo para los métodos modernos de comunicación que. Es interesante que la inmensa mayoría de estas críticas es por el camino de otras Iglesias. Typically it comes from Churches that are not growing criticizing Churches that are growing. Después de todo, if a Church is growing, they’ve got to be doing something wrong don’t they?

I have a tendency to go the other way on this one. De hecho, I’d go so far as to say if a Church isn’t working hard to be culturally relevant, it isn’t working hard to remain true to the Scriptures! You can’t be radically committed to the Scriptures without being radically committed to communicating the Scriptures in a culturally relevant manner.

It’s an easy statement to make because God has always communicated his message to people in a culturally relevant manner. Language, the time, place, ethnicity, gender, comunidad, governance, and more has always been taken into consideration as the message of God was communicated to a particular audience.

The Apostle Paul, a master missionary, knew this about the heart of God and understood that the Gospel must be contextualized to each specific culture:

#1 Take time to understand the culture of your audience.

"…for as I was walking along I saw your many altars…” Acts 17:23

#2 Be positive, not negative, about the culture of your audience.

“So Paul, standing before the Council, addressed them as follows: ’Men of Athens, I noticed that you are very religious…” Acts 17:22

#3 Use the culture of your audience to connect with the heart of your audience.

“His purpose in all of this was that the nations should seek after God and perhaps feel their way toward him and find him—though he is not far from any one of us. For in him we live and move and exist. As one of your own poets says, ‘We are his offspring.’” Acts 17:27-28

#4 Relationally speak truth to your audience.

“For he has set a day for judging the world with justice by the man he has appointed, and he proved to everyone who this is by raising him from the dead.” Acts 17:31


Sobre el autor

Paul Alexander is a Pastor, Leader, and Church Strategist. He has spent the last ten years of ministry serving in three mega-church settings as a Youth Pastor, Executive Pastor, and Lead Pastor. He has been married to his wife Lisa for 14 año. Together they have three children Kennedy, Mia, and Lincoln. You can follow Paul on Gorjeo or at his blog.

The Power of Words by Steve Sjogren

What to Say / What Not to Say

The verbal encounter we have with people as we are doing outreach is vital. Eso es, what we say – and what we don’t say — can make or break an encounter in outreach. There are ways of saying things that are more effective than others. We don’t want to say whatever pops into your head in general. We are connecting with people who are by and large are fearful, mistrusting, and even though they are curious about what we are doing they are at the same time not willing to put their trust in us — after all we are total strangers. The best way to do outreach verbally is to take a bit of time to think through what it is that we are trying to accomplish. As we are doing outreach to large numbers of people in our community we have lots of a opportunities to convey a verbal message as well as the strong action of giving them a gift – either something physical or a service.

We are wise to say just enough but not too much that they would draw back. I recommend we convey the following:

1. “This is free…”

2. “…this is to show you God’s kindness…”

Then stand back and watch what God does. Sometimes we will have people draw into the action and ask questions about why we are doing this. At other times we are just scattering seeds that are going to bear fruit over the long haul as their hearts are conditioned.

This matter of verbalizing with people you are connecting with is something that will grow as you invest more time to the process of outreach. You will learn the more ideal ways of saying things that fits in your neck of the woods.

I bless you to live, learn and grow in your outreach efforts!